Amazon S3: How to get a list of folders in the bucket?

All that I found, it's this method GET Bucket But I can't understand how can I get only a list of folders in the current folder. Which prefix and delimiter I need to use? Is that possible at all?


ANSWERS:


For the sake of example, assume I have a bucket in the USEast1 region called MyBucketName, with the following keys:

 temp/
 temp/foobar.txt
 temp/txt/
 temp/txt/test1.txt
 temp/txt/test2.txt
 temp2/

Working with folders can be confusing because S3 does not natively support a hierarchy structure -- rather, these are simply keys like any other S3 object. Folders are simply an abstraction available in the S3 web console to make it easier to navigate a bucket. So when we're working programatically, we want to find keys matching the dimensions of a 'folder' (delimiter '/', size = 0) because they will likely be 'folders' as presented to us by the S3 console.

Note for both examples: I'm using the AWSSDK.S3 version 3.1 NuGet package.

Example 1: All folders in a bucket

This code is modified from this basic example in the S3 documentation to list all keys in a bucket. The example below will identify all keys that end with the delimiter character /, and are also empty.

IAmazonS3 client;
using (client = new AmazonS3Client(Amazon.RegionEndpoint.USEast1))
{
    // Build your request to list objects in the bucket
    ListObjectsRequest request = new ListObjectsRequest
    {
        BucketName = "MyBucketName"
    };

    do
    {
        // Build your call out to S3 and store the response
        ListObjectsResponse response = client.ListObjects(request);

        // Filter through the response to find keys that:
        // - end with the delimiter character '/' 
        // - are empty. 
        IEnumerable<S3Object> folders = response.S3Objects.Where(x =>
            x.Key.EndsWith(@"/") && x.Size == 0);

        // Do something with your output keys.  For this example, we write to the console.
        folders.ToList().ForEach(x => System.Console.WriteLine(x.Key));

        // If the response is truncated, we'll make another request 
        // and pull the next batch of keys
        if (response.IsTruncated)
        {
            request.Marker = response.NextMarker;
        }
        else
        {
            request = null;
        }
    } while (request != null);
}

Expected output to console:

temp/
temp/txt/
temp2/

Example 2: Folders matching a specified prefix

You could further limit this to only retrieve folders matching a specified Prefix by setting the Prefix property on ListObjectsRequest.

ListObjectsRequest request = new ListObjectsRequest
    {
        BucketName = "MyBucketName",
        Prefix = "temp/"
    };

When applied to Example 1, we would expect the following output:

temp/
temp/txt/

Further reading:


Alternatively another simpler approach is using

Minio .Net implements minimal API's to work with Amazon S3 and other compatible storage solutions.

Following example shows how you can filter out only directories. Here the CommonPrefix is abstracted as a folder through the ListObjects() API.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

using Minio;
using Minio.Xml;

namespace Minio.Examples
{
    class ListObjects
    {
        static int Main(string[] args)
        {
            var client = new MinioClient("https://s3.amazonaws.com", "ACCESSKEY", "SECRETKEY");

            var items = client.ListObjects("bucket");

            foreach (Item item in items)
            {
                if (item.IsDir)
                {
                    Console.Out.WriteLine("{0}", item.Key);
                }
            }
            return 0;
        }
    }
}

Using prefix of the/path/to/read/ (note that there is no leading slash, but there is a trailing slash), and delimiter of /, you'll find all the folders within that folder inside <CommonPrefixes>.

CommonPrefixes

A response can contain CommonPrefixes only if you specify a delimiter. When you do, CommonPrefixes contains all (if there are any) keys between Prefix and the next occurrence of the string specified by delimiter. In effect, CommonPrefixes lists keys that act like subdirectories in the directory specified by Prefix. For example, if prefix is notes/ and delimiter is a slash (/), in notes/summer/july, the common prefix is notes/summer/. All of the keys rolled up in a common prefix count as a single return when calculating the number of returns. See MaxKeys.


What Anthony is missing here is that a folder doesn't necessarily have a key associated with it. If a file is created in S3, and given a key like "folder/name.ext", S3 will display a "folder" folder, but it doesn't have a key, meaning you're not getting it in your results.

The only way to catch these folders is to look at the keys themselves, and regex the key name for the "/" character. If I knew C# a little better, I'd write you a code sample, but for reference here's a python example I wrote on another question.



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