? how to test condition properly: je or jge

I sometimes use this pattern to iterate array of something: mov [rsp+.r12], r12 ; Choose a register that calls inside the loop won't modify mov r12, -1.i: inc r12 cmp r12, [rbp-.array_size
 ? how to test condition properly: je or jge

I sometimes use this pattern to iterate array of something: mov [rsp+.r12], r12 ; Choose a register that calls inside the loop won't modify mov r12, -1.i: inc r12 cmp r12, [rbp-.array_size
 ? how to test condition properly: je or jge

I sometimes use this pattern to iterate array of something: mov [rsp+.r12], r12 ; Choose a register that calls inside the loop won't modify mov r12, -1.i: inc r12 cmp r12, [rbp-.array_size
 ? How to cut off a variable in Assembly?

I am currently working on a project and for storage's sake i would like to cut off a variable in assembly, and (optionally) make that the value of a register, such as eax. I have tried to search the i
 ? Is there a limit to how far a JE can jump?

I heard somewhere that conditional jump instructions in the x86 instruction set were limited to 256 bytes. (In other words, the jump could not go further than 256 bytes.)Is this true? I have been writ
 ? how does addition of 8-bit or 16-bit offsets in jump instructions take place?

I have doubt whether in IA-32 architecture in case of jumps that use 8-bit or 16-bit offsets, addition of that offset to EIP register can affect the bits of EIP that don't have matching bits in offset
 ? Why is the stack filled with 0xCCCCCCCC

I'm currently disassembling some small C programs made in Visual Studio 2012 Express, and i've noticed a trend amongst the binaries.The first set of instructions executed in the main function are alwa
 ? When hooking a function, why does it not matter if you overwrite the first 5 bytes?

When hooking a function you need to overwrite 5 bytes of the original function, it doesn't matter about the initial setting up of the stack frame as the signatures and calling conventions are the same
 ? How to break on assembly instruction at a given address in gdb?

0x0000000000400448 <main+0>: push %rbp0x0000000000400449 <main+1>: mov %rsp,%rbp0x000000000040044c <main+4>: mov $0x6,%eax0x0000000000400451 <main+9>: leave
 ? Show current assembly instruction in GDB

I'm doing some assembly-level debugging in GDB. Is there a way to get GDB to show me the current assembly instruction in the same way that it shows the current source line? The default output after ev
 ? Show current assembly instruction in GDB

I'm doing some assembly-level debugging in GDB. Is there a way to get GDB to show me the current assembly instruction in the same way that it shows the current source line? The default output after ev
 ? Show current assembly instruction in GDB

I'm doing some assembly-level debugging in GDB. Is there a way to get GDB to show me the current assembly instruction in the same way that it shows the current source line? The default output after ev
 ? Switching to assembly in gdb

Is there is any way to switch to assembly when debugging a C or C++ program in gdb ? (Given that all source files and their corresponding assembly files are available) There is a way to disassemble
 ? How do I make gdb frontends show the current instruction arrow in assembly source code window?

I'm doing some x86 assembler coding on Linux (Arch 64), using nasm to assemble and ld to link, to create a 32-bit executable thus:wordcount: wordcount.o ld -o wordcount wordcount.o -melf_i386wordco
 ? How to make gdb show negative numbers during disassembly

Is it possible to make gdb show offsets as negative numbers during disassembly?For instance, I'm working with a book that shows (from a supposed disassembly dump of their function):0x08048394 : mov DW
 ? GDB TUI: Scroll assembly view above current instruction?

I've only just started using GDB recently, but I'm super impressed by it. No wonder it's the de-facto debugger for many users. One minor annoyance that I've found, though, is that I find myself unable

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